* applied patches from the most recent FreiFunkFirmware (and fixed compile errors...
[olsrd.git] / README
1
2 +====================================================================+
3 | README - olsr.org OLSR daemon 0.4.10, 23.11.05                     |
4 +====================================================================+
5
6 Andreas Tonnesen(andreto@olsr.org)
7 Thomas Lopatic  (thomas@lopatic.de)
8
9 http://www.olsr.org
10
11 CONTENTS:
12
13 I.   - GENERAL INFORMATION
14      * ABOUT
15      * GETTING HOLD OF OLSRD
16      * RELEASE NOTES
17      * RFC COMPLIANCE
18      * PLUGINS
19      * LINK QUALITY ROUTING
20      * KNOWN PROBLEMS
21      * FUTURE WORK
22
23 II.  - BUILDING AND RUNNING OLSRD
24      * GENERAL INFORMATION
25      * PLUGINS
26      * GUI FRONTENDS
27
28      * LINUX
29      * WINDOWS
30      * FREEBSD
31      * OSX
32   
33
34
35 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
36  I.   - GENERAL INFORMATION
37 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
38
39 =========
40  * ABOUT
41 =========
42
43 The olsr.org OLSR daemon is an implementation of the Optimized Link State
44 routing protocol. The protocol is documented in RFC3626. The website
45 of olsrd is http://www.olsr.org
46
47 Olsrd is designed to be a modular an extensible implementation. It features
48 a plugin interface, allowing for developers to extend OLSR operation without
49 interfering with the core code. It also features a experimental link quality
50 routing scheme.
51
52 To ask questions or make comments, join up with the mailing lists:
53 olsr-dev@olsr.org   - development discussion
54 olsr-users@olsr.org - usage discussion
55
56 A bug tracker is also available at the sourceforge project site
57 http://sourceforge.net/projects/olsrd/
58
59 Olsrd source or binaries can be downloaded from olsr.org. CVS is available
60 for the cutting edge features ;-)
61
62
63 =================
64  * RELEASE NOTES
65 =================
66
67
68
69 ==================
70  * RFC COMPLIANCE
71 ==================
72
73 If olsrd is ran without using link-quality routing/MPR selection it is RFC3626
74 compliant in that it will inter-operate with other RFC3626 implementations.
75 Internally there are a few things that are solved differently that proposed 
76 in the RFC. Check out the "Conclusions" section of the "Implementing And
77 Extending The Optimized Link State routing Protocol" thesis available at
78 olsr.org.
79
80
81 ===========
82  * PLUGINS
83 ===========
84
85 Olsrd supports dynamic loading of plugins(dynamically loaded libraries) for 
86 functions like generation and processing of private package types, setting
87 olsrd configurations in run-time and much more. This design is chosen for
88 amongst others, the following reasons:
89
90  * No need to change any code in the olsr daemon to add custom packages or 
91    functionality.
92  * Users are free to implement olsrd plugins and license them under whatever 
93    terms they like.
94  * The plugins can be written in any language that can be compiled as 
95    a dynamic library. Linux even allows scripts!
96  * No need for people with extended OLSR versions to rely on heavy patching 
97    to maintain functionality when new olsrd versions are released.
98
99 OLSR provides a default forwarding algorithm that allows for forwarding of OLSR 
100 messages of unknown types. This is really neat - because it means that even if 
101 only a subset of the nodes in the network actually known how to interpret 
102 a certain message type - all nodes will forward them according to the MPR 
103 pragma. A user may want to use the optimized flooding technique in OLSR to 
104 broadcast certain information, routing related or not, to all nodes that knows 
105 how to handle this message. Services that needs to broadcast/multicast data can 
106 encapsulate data in a private OLSR message type using a olsrd plugin. 
107
108 The design of the various entities of OLSR allows one to easily add special 
109 functionality into most aspects of OLSR. One can both register functions and 
110 unregister them with the socket parser, packet parser, scheduler and HNA set etc. 
111 This opens up for possibilities like intercepting current operation and replacing 
112 it with custom actions.
113
114   Plugins that are part of this release(can be found in the lib/ directory):
115
116   - Tiny Application Server(TAS).
117
118   - HttpInfo. This plugin implements a simple HTTP server that serves dynamic
119     pages with lots of information about the running olsrd process.
120
121   - Mini.
122
123   - Nameservice.
124
125   - Dynamic Internet gateway. A plugin that dynamically adds and removes Internet
126     HNA transmissions based on if there exists a default gateway to Internet
127     with hop count = 0(non OLSR gateway). It has been extended to be able to
128     ping Internet nodes to check for connectivity as well.
129
130   - Dot draw. A plugin that produces output in the dot format representing
131     the network topology.
132
133   - Secure OLSR plugin. This plugin adds a signature to all messages
134     to ensure data integrity. This way only nodes with access to the
135     shared key can participate in the routing.
136     You need to have the OpenSSL libs installed to use this plugin.
137
138   - Power plugin. A plugin that uses OLSRs MPR flooding to spread information
139     about the power status of nodes. Meant as an example plugin for code
140     reference only.
141
142
143 ========================
144  * LINK QUALITY ROUTING
145 ========================
146
147 Release 0.4.8 is the first version of olsrd that implements the ETX
148 link quality metric. This enables olsrd to prefer routes that have a
149 superior overall quality to routes that are worse but consist of less
150 hops. Have a look at the README-Link-Quality.html file for details.
151
152 ==================
153  * KNOWN PROBLEMS
154 ==================
155
156
157 ===============
158  * FUTURE WORK
159 ===============
160
161 Future releases of the 0.4 series will be maintainance releases focused
162 on bugfixing. Work will soon begin on a 0.5 series where we will focus
163 much more on new ideas. 0.4 and 0.5 might coexist for some time. 
164
165 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
166  II.  - BUILDING AND RUNNING OLSRD
167 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
168
169 =======================
170  * GENERAL INFORMATION
171 =======================
172
173 Olsrd is implemented in pure C with very few dependencies. Olsrd is 
174 known to run on various hardware like:
175  * x86    - your regular PC
176  * PPC    - Macintosh hardware
177  * MIPSEL - Embedded systems like the LinkSys WRT54g
178  * ARM    - Embedded systems like Compaq/HP iPaq
179 A binary tarball featuring x86, MIPSEL and ARM binaries is available
180 for download at olsr.org
181
182 ===========
183  * PLUGINS
184 ===========
185
186 All the available plugins are also implemented in C and requires gcc/libc
187 to build. the dot_draw plugin compiles for Windows and GNU/Linux. the rest
188 of the plugins will only compile for GNU/Linux.
189 Building the plugins are just a matter of executing:
190 make
191 while installing requires(as root):
192 make install
193 To use the plugins add them to the olsrd configuration file.
194
195 =====================
196  * OS SUPPORT STATUS
197 =====================
198
199 COMPONENT/OS    Linux   Win32   FreeBSD NetBSD  OpenBSD OSX
200 ------------------------------------------------------------
201 olsrd           +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
202 olsr_switch     +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
203 ------------------------------------------------------------
204 PLUGINS
205 dot_draw        +/+     +/?     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
206 dyn_gw          +/+     +/?     +/-     +/-     +/-     ?
207 httpinfo        +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
208 mini            +/+     +/?     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
209 nameservice     +/+     +/?     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
210 powerinfo       +/+     +/+     +/-     +/-     +/-     ?
211 secure          +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     +/+     ?
212 tas             +/+     -       -       -       -       ?
213 ------------------------------------------------------------
214
215 LEGEND:   +/+ = compiles/runs
216           +/- = compiles/does not work
217           -   = does not compile
218           ?   = unknown
219
220 =================
221  * GUI FRONTENDS
222 =================
223
224 A GUI front end for GNU/Linux using GTK is available in the gui/ 
225 directory. This implementation is no longer supported, and might
226 not work any more. It will be completly removed in a future release.
227
228 There currently is, however, a native MFC-based Windows GUI. Unlike
229 olsrd the GUI has to be compiled with Visual C++ 6. It can be found in
230 the gui/win32/ directory. Simply open the "Frontend.dsw" workspace in
231 the Visual C++ 6 IDE. Then compile "Frontend" and "Shim", which
232 creates "Switch.exe" and "Shim.exe".
233
234 To run the Windows GUI simply make sure that "Switch.exe", "Shim.exe",
235 "olsrd.exe", "olsrd_cfgparser.dll", and "Default.olsr" are located in
236 the same directory and run "Switch.exe". "Shim.exe" is just an
237 auxiliary console application that is required by "Switch.exe".
238
239 The GUI is pretty self-explanatory. The three buttons on the lower
240 right of the GUI window start the OLSR server, stop the OLSR server,
241 and exit the GUI.
242
243 Use the "Settings" tab to specify the options that the GUI uses to run
244 the OLSR server "olsrd.exe". When you click "Start" the GUI generates
245 a temporary configuration file from the information given by the
246 "Settings" tab. This temporary configuration file is passed to the
247 OLSR server via its "-f" option.
248
249 "Offer Internet connection" is only available if you have an Internet
250 connection, i.e. if you have a default route configured. If you tick
251 this option an HNA entry for the default route is added to the
252 temporary configuration file, allowing other nodes in the OLSR network
253 to use your Internet connection.
254
255 IP version 6 cannot currently be selected, as support for IPv6 is not
256 yet complete in the Windows version.
257
258 "Enable ETX link quality" tells the OLSR server to detect the quality
259 of its links to its neighbors using a variant of the ETX
260 metric. "Window size" specifies the number of most recent packets to
261 be used when calculating the packet loss. If, for example, this
262 parameter is set to 10, then the OLSR server will calculate the packet
263 loss among the most recent 10 OLSR packets received from each
264 neighbor. If "For MPR selection only" is active, the link quality
265 information is only used to select MPRs that offer the best paths to
266 your two-hop neighbors. If "For MPR selection and routing" is active,
267 the link quality is additionally used to create the routing table.
268
269 WARNING - Enabling ETX breaks compliance with the OLSR
270 standard. ETX-enabled nodes do not inter-operate with nodes that have
271 ETX switched off. DO NOT USE NODES WITH DIFFERENT ETX SETTINGS IN A
272 SINGLE NETWORK!
273
274 The three buttons on the lower right of the "Settings" tab open
275 previously saved settings, save the current settings to a
276 configuration file, and reset the current settings to default values.
277
278 If you start the GUI with the path to a configuration file as the only
279 command line argument, the GUI opens the given configuration file and
280 runs the OLSR server with this configuration. So, saving a
281 configuration file with a ".olsr" extension, for example, and making
282 "Switch.exe" the handler for ".olsr" files enables you to run the OLSR
283 server with a simple double click on the configuration file.
284
285 The "Output" tab shows the output of the currently running OLSR
286 server. The output is limited to 1000 lines. The 1001st line will make
287 the first line disappear and so on. When you click "Start" The GUI
288 simply invokes the OLSR server "olsrd.exe" and intercepts its console
289 output. Use the four buttons on the upper right of the tab to freeze
290 the output, resume frozen output, save the output to a file, or clear
291 the output.
292
293 The "Nodes" tab contains information about the nodes that the OLSR
294 server currently knows about. If you click on the address of a node in
295 the "Node list" list box, the GUI populates the three "Node
296 information" list boxes on the right with the multi-point relays of
297 the selected node (MPR), the interfaces of the selected node (MID),
298 and the non-OLSR networks accessible via the selected node (HNA).
299
300 The "Routes" tab shows the routes that the currently running OLSR
301 server has added.
302
303 The default settings for the "Settings" tab are taken from the
304 "Default.olsr" file. The configuration of the last interface in this
305 file is used to populate the per-interface settings (HELLO interval,
306 etc.) in the "Settings" tab. If you do not want to specify any
307 interface in "Default.olsr", the problem arises that you do not have
308 such a last interface. In this case simply create an interface with
309 the special name of "GUI". This tells the GUI to use the configuration
310 of the interface for the per-interface settings and to forget about
311 this interface afterward. See the comments in the "Default.olsr" file
312 for details.
313
314
315 =========
316  * LINUX
317 =========
318
319 To build olsrd you need to have all the regular development tools 
320 installed. This includes gcc, make, glibc, makedep etc.
321 To install to a directory different from /(/etc, /usr/bin) use 
322 INSTALL_PREFIX=targetdir. To use other compilers set CC=yourcompiler.
323
324 To build:
325  make
326 To install(as root):
327  make install
328 To delete object files run:
329  make clean
330 Optionally, to clean all generated files:
331  make uberclean
332
333 Before running olsrd you must edit the default configuration file 
334 /etc/olsrd.conf adding at least what interfaces olsrd is to run on. 
335 Options in the config file can also be overridden by command line 
336 options. See the manual pages olsrd(8) and olsrd.conf(5) for details.
337 The binary is named 'olsrd' and is installed in (PREFIX)/usr/sbin. 
338 You must have root privileges to run olsrd!
339 To run olsrd just type:
340 olsrd
341
342 If debug level is set to 0 olsrd will detach and run in the background, 
343 if not it will keep running in your shell.
344
345 ===========
346  * WINDOWS
347 ===========
348
349 *** COMPILING
350
351 To compile the Windows version of the OLSR server or the dot_draw
352 plugin you need a Cygwin installation with a current version of GCC
353 and Mingw32. Simply use
354
355   make
356
357 to build the olsrd executable. Building the dot_draw plugin works
358 slightly different, we do not yet have a unified makefile for all
359 architectures here. Switch to the dot_draw directory lib/dot_draw/ and
360 generate the Windows makefile by saying
361
362   ./mkmf.sh
363
364 This will generate "Makefile.win32" by adding dependencies to
365 "Makefile.win32.in". Then just say
366
367   make -f Makefile.win32
368
369 to build the dot_draw plugin. However, make sure that you have build
370 olsrd before that, as the dot_draw plugin requires some object files
371 that are only generated when olsrd is built.
372
373 *** INTERFACE NAMING
374
375 On Linux network interfaces have nice names like "eth0". In contrast,
376 Windows internally identifies network interfaces by pretty awkward
377 names, for example:
378
379   "{EECD2AB6-C2FC-4826-B92E-CAA53B29D67C}"
380
381 Hence, the Windows version implements its own naming scheme that maps
382 each internal name to a made-up name like "if03", which is easier to
383 memorize. Simply invoke the OLSR server as follows to obtain its view
384 of your interfaces:
385
386   olsrd.exe -int
387
388 This lists the made-up interface names along with their current IP
389 addresses to enable you to find out which made-up interface name
390 corresponds to which of your physical interfaces.
391
392 "+" in front of the IP addresses means that the OLSR server has
393 identified the interface as a WLAN interface. "-" indicates that the
394 OLSR server considers this interface to be a wired interface. "?"
395 means "no idea". Detection currently only works on NT, 2000, and
396 XP. Windows 9x and ME will always display "?".
397
398 For techies: The made-up names consist of the string "if" followed by
399 a two-digit hex representation of the least significant byte of the
400 Windows-internal interface index, which should be different for each
401 interface and thus make each made-up name unique. Again, this is
402 undocumented and this assumption may be wrong in certain cases. So, if
403 the "-int" option reports two interfaces that have the same name,
404 please do let me know.
405
406 *** CONFIGURATION FILE
407
408 If you do not specify a configuration file, the OLSR server
409 ("olsrd.exe") by default attempts to use "olsrd.conf" in your Windows
410 directory, e.g. "C:\WINDOWS\olsrd.conf".
411
412
413 =========================
414  * FREEBSD/NETBSD/OPENBSD
415 =========================
416
417 The FreeBSD port should be relativley stable at this point.
418 The OpenBSD and NetBSD versions are pretty much untested. They have 
419 not been extensively tested beyond "doesn't core dump and it looks 
420 like it adds routes". In order to build it, you need GNU make. Then 
421 use:
422
423   gmake
424
425 to build the olsrd executable. Then do:
426
427   gmake install
428
429 to install the executable, the default configuration file, and the
430 manual pages. So, basically it's the same as on Linux. Have a look at
431 the Linux section for details.
432
433 =======
434  * OSX
435 =======
436
437 The OS X port is a direct descendant of the FreeBSD port. So, the same
438 limitations with respect to testing and maturity apply. Building and
439 installing works in the same was as on FreeBSD.
440
441
442 $Id: README,v 1.16 2005/11/23 05:51:07 kattemat Exp $